Site Model

The first open-access digital encyclopaedia on sociability in Europe throughout the long-eighteenth century

Site Model

Description & objectives


Tea Party at Lord Harrington's House, St. James's, Charles Philips (1730)


The Digital Encyclopaedia of European Sociability (DIGITENS) project will produce the first open-access digital encyclopaedia on sociability in Europe throughout the long-eighteenth century. The purpose of the DIGITENS project is twofold:

1. to develop the scope of research into British sociability in the long eighteenth century,

2. to relate British models of sociability to other European and colonial models of sociability and to examine how models and forms circulated from one society to the others, were appropriated and modified, encouraging the dissemination and construction of new models of sociability in Europe.

The purpose of the DIGITENS project is to build an original framework for understanding the interactions, tensions, limits and paradoxes underlying European models of sociability and to reflect on the following question: can the emergence and formation of European models of sociability be traced throughout the long eighteenth century (1650-1850)?

Drawing upon the expertise of international members from different disciplines and national traditions, the project will create a toplevel interdisciplinary network and facilitate intersectoral communication between its academic and non-academic partners.The seven international universities will work together with the Bibliothèque Nationale de France, Musée Cognacq-Jay in France, The National Archives in the United-Kingdom and McGill University allowing members to explore how understandings of sociability might be enhanced through dialogue, international collaboration, and digital technology, developing a broader contextualisation of the research into European sociability.

Through the implementation of outreach events, workshops and the production of the accessible digital platform, the DIGITENS team will promote a wide investigation of the value of eighteenth century principles in twenty-first-century private and public lives throughout Europe.